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ThoughtsOnline

Monday, July 25, 2011


Here's my response to James Capretta's suggestions on what the GOP should do next...

Dear James:

No offense, but this is too much of an inside-Washington perspective... too much focus on the details of a deal, an acceptance of conditions as they exist and failing to rally the public behind what we're trying to do so that we can get what we want and not have to settle for what we might be able to get.

The GOP needs to stop talking about this in the abstract. The public doesn't care about abstracts, they view the world through the prism of 'how does this affect me'...

Thus, the GOP needs to be doing a better job communicating to the general public (which isn't the hard core who read NR) that Obama's spending and anti-business agenda is killing the economy... and as bad as the economy is right now, it will be even worse if the debt limit is raised without significant and measurable cuts in real spending. They have to make the public fear an increase in the debt limit more than they fear the upheaval if the debt limit isn't raised by August 2nd. And they have to sell the public on the idea that if we made big cuts in spending (and reined in Obama in other ways as well) that the economy would immediately start to improve... gas prices would start to come down, housing prices would start back up, employment would improve and so on. And if Obama gets his way? Unemployment over 10%... housing prices start downward again... health insurance prices will go up further than in the past... and so on (all reasonable predictions).

Were the GOP to be doing this, they could pretty much write the package they want. Keep in mind this worked - in reverse - for Obama with his stimulus, he convinced the public that the world would end without a trillion dollar package... and the public didn't rise up in protest.

It's time for the GOP to not let a good crisis go to waste.

Oh, what am I thinking? The GOP has historically been rather inept from a PR perspective (too many Washington insiders in charge of policy and positioning). Oh well.